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08.08.2014

Want to sleep in a longhouse

The life in the viking age in Iceland was not easy and you can see the oldest archaeological findings in Reykjavik center from that time in the exhibition Reykjavik 871±2 which is now preserved in its original location as the focal point of the exhibition about life in Viking-Age Reykjavík, right next to the Hotel Reykjavik Centrum.

The life in the viking age in Iceland was not easy and you can see the oldest archaeological findings in Reykjavik center from that time in the exhibition Reykjavik 871±2  which is now preserved in its original location as the focal point of the exhibition about life in Viking-Age Reykjavík, right next to the Hotel Reykjavik Centrum.  The exhibition aims to provide insight into the environment of the Reykjavík farm at the time of the first settlers.

The Settlement of Iceland

It is said that Iceland was settled from 870 to 930 after Christ. There are remains from Irish monks that are supposed to have lived here before that but they left Iceland around the time when the Vikings came to the country. 

A viking called Naddoddur,  was the  first of all Nordic people to stay in Iceland. He did not stay here for a long but eh named the country Snæland, The land of Snow. Followed by a Swedish viking Garðar Svavarsson  is supposed to have been here after Naddoddur. He was supposed to sail around the island and named the country Garðars-island or in Icelandic Garðarshólmi 
The official first settler of  Iceland is belived to be Hrafna Flóki (Raven-Floki), named after the three ravens he had to help him find his way. Hrafna Flóki did not like the cold stay and when he spotted a drift ice in the fjord he decided to name it Iceland, or in Icelandic, Ísland. 
The first permanent settler in Iceland is considered to be Ingólfur Arnarson. In the year aroun 874 Ingólfur found the two carved pillars he threw overboard in a place he named Reykjavík. 
Archeological findings in Reykjavík are consistent with the date given there: there was a settlement in Reykjavík around 870.

A Viking age longhouse
A Viking-Age longhouse, dated to around 930 AD was found in archaeological excavations in the centre of Reykjavík in 2001.  The ruins of the longhouse and a part of a man made structure – a turf wall, have been preserved and are now on display “on site” in the exhibition.  Reykjavík 871±2 is an exhibition on the settlement of Reykjavík and is based on scholars' theories on what the heritage sites in central Reykjavík reveal about the life and work of the first settlers. Also on display are objects from the Viking Age found in central Reykjavík and the island of Viðey.
 The exhibition is located in Reykjavík old centre, on the corner of Aðalstræti and Suðurgata and it is perfect to accommodate at the Hotel Reykjavik Centrum, right next to the  oldest archaeological findings in Reykjavík.